Harvey & Foote Law Firm
Nursing Home Abuse And Personal InjuryThroughout New Mexico

Brain injury caused by serious accident has link to Alzheimer's

Brain injuries can cause people in New Mexico to experience a wide array of life-altering cognitive problems. These include difficulty thinking as well as memory problems; victims may also experience mood swings and attention deficits. Recent university research has provided additional information regarding the connection between traumatic brain injury, which can be caused by a serious accident, and Alzheimer's disease or other neurodegenerative disorders.

Researchers discovered a toxic tau protein form that increases following traumatic injury to the brain. This toxic form might cause a person to develop a chronic condition known as traumatic encephalopathy. However, it was unclear whether the protein had the potential to cause symptoms related to dementia.

To test the dementia idea, researchers isolated the tau protein from creatures that had suffered traumatic brain injuries, and they injected the protein into a different animal group. The second animal group developed mental impairments similar to those resulting from Alzheimer's disease. Information from research in this area suggests that the higher prevalence of developing Alzheimer's disease several years following a traumatic brain injury might be because of the spreading of toxic tau that is released after the brain is injured.

Unfortunately, no treatments are currently available for traumatic brain injury's long-term impacts. However, promising treatment options may be developed in the future as research in this area continues. Those in New Mexico who have suffered traumatic brain injuries in a serious accident caused by the negligence of another party have the right to file a personal injury claim, seeking damages that -- if achieved -- may help them to cover their ongoing medical costs and other expenses associated with the accident.

Source: news-medical.net, "New UTMB study reveals link between traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer's disease", Jan. 13, 2016

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